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FullSizeRenderFor me, this hasn’t been a very successful turkey season. With spending the least amount of time ever spent spring turkey hunting in the woods, my lack of success was to be expected. As I scroll through social media and see all the successful harvests at each of the outfitters that we are traveling more than 15 hours to hunt with, I have high hopes that my luck will change at the two Ladies in Camo turkey hunts we are about to spend the next seven days hunting. Six ladies from four different states are converging upon Misty Morning Outfitters in Kansas to hunt Rio Grand turkey, and four are traveling on to The Roost in Nebraska to hunt Merriam’s turkey.

 

Rebecca

Rebecca’s 1st turkey harvest! Photo Credit: Rebecca Gicewicz

 

Rebecca, from Florida, is traveling with us…asleep in the back seat of Cletus as I type this entry. Kim and Marla are traveling together from Illinois. Sherry and Connie are traveling together from Michigan. None of us “NEW” to turkey hunting, however, this is Connie’s first guided outfitter hunt; this will be Rebecca’s 2nd and 3rd bird and species as she recently harvested her first turkey, an Eastern in Alabama; and Kim and Marla were just in the woods turkey hunting this past weekend.

 

I have been fortunate enough to have hunted some place at a point in time with each of these women, except Connie. I am looking forward to gaining a new hunting friend. It has been nearly eight years since I have hunted with Sherry, who attended my very first hunt I organized. It has been nearly four years since I have hunted with Marla and just last September that I hunted with Rebecca and Kim. I feel blessed to be able to call these ladies friends.

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Kim’s opening day harvest! Photo Credit: Kim Hessing

My plan is to share as much of this hunt with all of my blog followers and subscribers, as well as my social media friends and followers. I will post some contributed blog entries and photos from the ladies attending this hunt if they wish to contribute. Look for stories of our travels, our good times at the lodge, photos and tales from the hunt, and of course, all the shenanigans. Check out the Ladies in Camo and Life in Camo Facebook page, search the hashtags #LICMMO16 and #LICTheRoost16 in social media to keep up with posts from the Ladies in Camo Kansas and Nebraska turkey hunts.

 

2015 Wilcox CountyAs we are rolling through north central Oklahoma, crossing over into Kansas, with just two more hours of travel, my mind is already on the turkey hunt…wishing these ladies the best of luck in the coming days.

I hope we ALL have the opportunity to “dance with a fist full of feathers!”


As our annual hunting pilgrimage to the West comes to a close we can be thankful for the time we spent in the woods enjoying nature. It is always bittersweet when we head back South; thankful to be headed home for a little rest but sad to be ending our adventure.

Unfortunately we are on our way home without a harvest this year, however you can not measure the great memories made. How can one not be thoroughly satisfied sitting 20 feet closer to Heaven with a front row seat to the Show? That is what this journey is all about.

Our 9-day trip started off rifle hunting in Kentucky. After pulling our camera cards we didn’t have anything new so we decided to stay in the stand we had hunted on our earlier trip. We seen 3 young bucks and 6 does during our Saturday hunt. On Sunday, a wind advisory was issued four our area and the wind was absolutely terrible; it was so windy it was a struggle for Richard to pull the cameraman stand we were taking to Kansas with us. We decided to head to Kansas half a day early to bow hunt; leaving Kentucky at noon.

We were excited to be in Kansas—one of our favorite states to hunt. It was really looking good for us since on day one of our Kansas trip, we no longer had Hank unloaded and was on our way to the field to pull camera cards when our first sight was a nice big buck chasing a doe across the field in front of us. Later in the week, I sat in awe as I watched a young 8-point come into our set up looking for a fight after a rattling sequence; not only once but 4 times. On one of our last few days, we watched as a young 6-point approached our decoy in a submissive manner trying everything he could do, short of touching it of course, to get the decoy to acknowledge him.

A nice buck did come up behind us at 60 yards following a doe. I caught a glimpse of a doe over my left shoulder that was on a trail going straight to the field in front of us. I giggle about that buck sighting because of what happened to Richard.

When I spotted the doe, I whispered to Richard letting him know the location of the doe. His cameraman stand was on the right side of me facing opposite of the doe’s location. As soon as Richard seen the doe, we both stood up hoping a buck would be following her. At this vantage point, I saw the buck and I immediately whispered, “Don’t move, buck!” I gave the location of the buck, but Richard never had the opportunity to see the buck; a huge tree with two trunks directly behind us blocked it.

The buck that snuck in behind us but moved on before Richard ever got a look at him.

I tried several times to tell him and to motion where the buck was located without getting busted. All of the sudden I heard Richard’s heavy breathing. Then I glanced slowly over at him and only caught glimpse of his legs…they were shaking. Then I heard the shake in his voice when he asked me if I could still see the buck. I was concentrating on the buck when out of the corner of my eye I saw a few smaller branches shaking on the tree. I could not help but to silently belly chuckle. I could physically feel Richard shaking the tree.

The buck never did produce himself for a shot and when the doe turned back and trotted into the woods parallel to the field, the buck followed walking out of sight. I looked at Richard and said, “He walked out with the doe.” Richard let out some air and sat down. I asked him with a giggle, “You going to be alright.” He laughed and said, “I don’t know why I started shaking and got so excited like that.” He said, “Buck fever, I guess.” I laughed about it a few more times while in that tree that afternoon. I could physically feel and hear his emotion—I don’t know why I didn’t catch it and start shaking myself. What is so odd is he was behind the camera not the weapon and ironically he doesn’t get buck fever behind a gun.

The winds started picking up as the week progressed in Kansas. The forecast was not looking good for the weekend and although our deer camera photos where showing a few promising bucks, we had not seen much deer activity on any of our hunts. With the 25-30 mile an hour wind and the fact we were not seeing much rut activity or deer sightings, we decided to leave Kansas several days early, returning to Kentucky to rifle hunt.

The main frame 8 with G2 kicker while in velvet on one of our cameras set up earlier this year.

Beautiful Kansas main frame 8 with a kicker on his G2 out of velvet a few days before our arrival. This was a photo from Allen's game camera.

A Kansas 10-point that Allen got on his deer cam. This buck had a huge body...

Kentucky proved to have more deer movement, just not the deer we were looking to harvest. Sunday’s rain and thunderstorms found us packing up early and driving home. But before we left, we put out 5 deer cams to do a little scouting for us in hopes of a successful trip during the 4-day Thanksgiving holiday. Yep, that’s right..3 days work at our full-time employment, a night of washing and drying hunting clothes, a 7-hour one-way trip and we will turn around and do this all over again. Some call us crazy. Some say we are obsessed. Others may say we are dedicated–we settle with simply “doing what we love and loving what we do.” Our Life in Camo is not about what we harvest. It is about enjoying the journey and making memories along the way.


What an exciting afternoon. The wind picked up during our afternoon hunt and we had not seen any movement at all. I was beginning to feel let down, unlucky or just plain bored. The afternoon light was quickly fading away and the temperature was dropping noticeably. I had already asked Richard a few seconds earlier if he was ready to call the hunt. He had replied, “Just a little longer.” So I patiently waited.

Just before we started packing up to come down out of the stand, Richard had decided to rattle a little. Shortly after he stopped and was waiting a few minutes to see if it had conjured up any interest, I heard something coming quickly through the woods just over my left shoulder. I whispered to Richard, “I hear something at 7 o’clock.” He nodded. Then I saw it. It was a nice 8 point buck, however, not what I came all the way to Kansas for. We watched as he came in looking for the fight. He walked a half circle around our stand set up. He lost interest and started to walk away, across the hay field.

I grunted and snort wheezed, more out of curiosity than for the dire need to have the buck return. The buck heard the grunt but moved on. The snort wheeze only stopped him for a split second. The buck kept walking away from us.

When the buck was a little over 100 yards away, Richard once again hit the rattling horns. The buck stopped so short, it was comical. It threw its head up, scanning in our immediate direction. It took off at a run back to our stand. The buck walked under our stand and circled it, returning to the hay field and once again started across it.

Richard rattled the horns in a short series and the buck came running in once again, this time to the left of the stand. It walked into the woods behind us and we could hear him rambling for a while before moving on.

I was absolutely amazed as to how the buck not only reacted to the rattling horns, but how it could precisely tell within 10 feet the exact area the sound came from. This was my first experience with rattling horns. This 2.5-year-old buck came in looking for a fight. Ironic, since I know he is not the biggest buck in the area.

Tomorrow we will have a decoy out and this should really be interesting if this young buck is in the area. The low tonight will be in the 20s with a high tomorrow around 46. The rest of the week will progressively get colder so we are looking forward to that. We have gotten several good deer on camera and have seen a few chasing so one can never tell what is going to happen this time of the season. Stay tuned for some updates. Good luck to those hunting this week.

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Good Morning! I was up and at it early this morning and already at my job in the concrete jungle. I have an hour to spend on my side hustle and then it is my 8-5'er. Wishing everyone a productive and amazing day! Nestled in my favorite spot at Village Coffee cranking out some text as the sky spits rain outside. A perfect day for writing. Wishing you an amazing day. #LifeinCamoMedia #LifeinCamo It doesn't matter if I am climbing a mountain or climbing into a treestand, I can count on  @alpsoutdoorz. #POMA2017 #exceedyourexpectations With all this rainy weather and the Indoor AC cranked, it is a perfect afternoon for a cup of #yogitea. My brew today is Sweet Tangerine Positive Energy.
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